devotions

There are so many beautiful lines from Mary Oliver that are quoted regularly in mindfulness and yoga circles, probably because they’re beautiful and they’re also very true. One of them is “attention is the beginning of devotion” from her essay “Upstream.” (An article in the Atlantic, reflecting on that essay is here.) I could spend ages diving into Oliver’s work and I’m incredibly grateful that I have the opportunity to do just that.

I’ve been living closely with her work for the past few months and will continue to do so through the summer when I’ll be guiding a workshop at Poets House on her work.

In this practical workshop, we’ll dive into Oliver’s work and make use of Poets House’s waterfront location to cultivate attention as we listen to the world and explore our “place in the family of things.” We will create new poems and investigate earnestness, accessibility, and darkness in Oliver’s work, focusing on Dream Work and Devotions.

The course runs from June 11-July 16, 2020 and registration is open until May 22nd.

Poets House is wheelchair accessible & located at 10 River Terrace in New York City.

instinct for cooperation

I’m so excited to see the library immortalized in The Instinct for Cooperation: A graphic novel conversation with Noam Chomsky & Jeffrey Wilson, just out from Seven Stories Press. Illustrated by Eliseu Gouveia.

Jamie & Zachary are featured in one of the chapters about the library – they were heroes to me before, but now, illustrated, even more so!

“Incidentally the power structures were very worried about the library.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Illuminator

Maybe it’s all the retrograde planets now making me remember old times. Or maybe the fact that Mark Read appeared to me in a dream, messing around with machines and wires. Whatever the reason, the Illuminator‘s early days have been on my mind & looking at this site I realized I never posted much about it.

Here’s a video of the first night we drove into Manhattan to Zuccotti Park fully expecting to get arrested. We had a lawyer with us on board, just in case, Lopi steering the ship, Danny & I repping the library, Brandon on documentation & Mark. Apologies if I’ve forgotten anyone else who was with us in the van, seems so long ago already.


N17 blew people’s minds. The light then really made me know that the city is ours, the streets are ours. “You are a part of a global uprising… Another world is possible.” It’s been almost five years, is there still any doubt? I’m so deeply grateful to have been part of this & share the video below for those who weren’t there.

other Illuminator/N17 coverage:
AlterNetBeautiful Trouble | Boing Boing | CNNThe Guardian | The New York Times |

pre-order

I’ve just been informed that books are now available for pre-order at the Belladonna site. Pre-order now with free shipping. Books ship March 1, 2015.

anyl

$15 • Forthcoming 2015 • 70 pp. • 6.5″ x 8″
ISBN: 978-0-9885399-2-1

Lovely blurbs on the site including this one:

All is not yet lost bears witness to the interconnectedness, and interdependence that is unearthed in the fertile chaos of change. Through the cycles of degradation, disintegration and necessary resurrection that shape the dance of environmental, political and personal revolution we find common dreams and common ground: “a bond of love exists… the miraculous present.”

toasting 2014

What a year! A toast! a toast

LaTasha N. Nevada Diggs wrote a wonderful year-end summary for the Walker Art Center: 2014: The Year According to LaTasha N. Nevada Diggs.

I’m grateful that All Is Not Yet Lost is included on her list of books for people to get hold of. Thank you, LaTasha. It’s not out quite yet–but soon! One more reason to get excited about 2015.

names disguised

names disguisedI got home to a box of books! Books!
Names Disguised is out in the world thanks to Make Now Press. Thank you, Ara, for all your hard work!

I also want to thank the editors of the following journals and presses where some of the poems appeared in earlier forms: Coconut, Dusie, Lungfull!, Little Red Leaves, 3 Sad Tigers. Thanks everybody!

(for library geeks, it’s  ISBN 978-0-9815962-9-7)

Babylon makes the rules

Michael’s round-up of media coverage on the library blog brought the Daily News’ article to my attention. It’s got a lovely quotation that recalls some of what this settlement’s about:

“Remember the anti-authority message of Occupy Wall Street? Remember the backlash over its vague goals and nebulous methods? Surprise! Occupy Wall Street (OWS) just struck a sizeable victory, and it came by working within the system.”
Read more here.

Working within the system.

Babylon makes the rules, but that doesn’t mean we’re incapable of playing by them. 

what’s been going on?

Atlantic PacificSubway-wise, the MTA’s officially announced a name change for our beloved hub. It will always be Atlantic-Pacific to me.

Poetry-wise, some of my poems were in the April edition of the Brooklyn Rail.

Library-wise, we filed a lawsuit against Bloomberg, Ray Kelly, the NYPD, the Dept of Sanitation, and the City of New York. w00t! The case is Occupy Wall Street et al. v. Michael Bloomberg et al., U.S. District Court, Southern District of New York, No. 12-4129. The full complaint is here.

Michele said it well in her post, “We believe that the raid and its aftermath violated our First-Amendment rights to free expression, Fourth-Amendment rights against unlawful search and seizure, and Fourteenth-Amendment rights to due process, as well as the laws of the City of New York regarding the vouchsafing of seized property.” What’s most exciting to me is what we might turn up in the discovery process. As Norman Siegel points out, the suit “not only addresses the seizure and destruction of the books, but it also seeks to show why, how, and who planned the raid on Zuccotti Park.”